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January 2021

This report reviews existing literature and compiles equity metrics for the implementation of 100% renewable energy policy. We created this literature review for energy regulators and communities engaged in energy rulemaking proceedings in particular. The content may also be adapted to address equity initiatives within utilities, and used by advocates in independent efforts to hold utilities accountable to equity standards. The resources provided are meant to provide a flexible basis from which to expand systems of accountability regarding equity goals in the implementation of 100% renewable energy (or 100% clean energy) policy.

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April 2021

There is a strong push towards transportation electrification and utilities are in a critical role in supporting the deployment of necessary charging infrastructure. This report recognizes that LMI and DACs stand to benefit greatly from this electrification but are at risk of missing out on the benefits. This report highlights how utilities, regulatory bodies, and other relevant parties can be intentional in their efforts in transportation electrification so various customer segments are not left behind

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May 2021

This report recognizes that when it comes to transportation, many of the most critical decisions are made at the city level. In this report, the authors look to cities that have made strides in this area as case studies for how equity considerations play out in practice. The report provides recommendations and examples of equitable practices and stakeholder engagement to cities that are developing and implementing their own electric transportation road maps and strategies.

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June 2021

This document provides the Vehicle Technologies Office with a "primer" of key concepts and metrics relevant to energy equity and justice. It touches on how the focus on technical aspects of transportation improvements have failed to account for the real-world impact, and the negative impact on equity outcomes.

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May 2021

This report offers a recap of an event hosted by EVHybridNoire and the Great Plains Institute. The event aimed to expose automakers, electric utilities, policy makers, and other EV stakeholders in the Midwest and Gulf Coast regions to a high-level discussion about equitable transportation electrification.

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January 2022

This interactive map helps analyze current data to indicate the local areas most likely to be underserved or in distress by lack of community development, income, housing, employment opportunities, transportation, medical treatment, nutrition, education and clean environment.

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January 2022

This equity planning toolkit helps SPU be intentional about equity considerations within any prospective program. By going through the worksheet, program decision makers are forced to make equity considerations and develop plans that hope to produce just outcomes.

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September 2020

This report provides an updated snapshot of U.S. energy burdens (i.e., the percentage of household income spent on home energy bills) nationally, regionally, and in 25 select metro areas in the United States.1,2 Both high and severe energy burdens are caused by physical, economic, social, and behavioral factors, and they impact physical and mental health, education, nutrition, job performance, and community development. Energy efficiency and weatherization can help address energy insecurity (i.e., the inability to adequately meet basic household heating, cooling, and energy needs over time) by improving building energy efficiency, reducing energy bills, and improving indoor air quality and comfort (Hernández 2016).

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May 2022

Income-based energy poverty metrics ignore people’s behavior patterns, particularly reducing energy consumption to limit financial stress. We investigate energy-limiting behavior in low-income households using a residential electricity consumption dataset. We first determine the outdoor temperature at which households start using cooling systems, the inflection temperature. Our relative energy poverty metric, the energy equity gap, is defined as the difference in the inflection temperatures between low and high-income groups.

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July 2021

On September 3, 2020, the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) launched the Equitable Energy Efficiency (E3) Proceeding with a goal of defining equity in the context of the state’s ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs (Conservation and Load Management or C&LM programs), developing specific metrics to determine which customer demographics are underserved by the current programs, and expanding the inclusion and participation of individuals from underserved communities in those programs

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November 2021

This issue brief aims to contextualize current energy equity issues around the complex intersection of race, income, gender, and geographical discrimination, focusing on three dimensions of energy injustice that we use to define energy inequity: energy burden, clean energy access, and clean energy employment.

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July 2021

Accountability is critical to equity work. DEEP plans to issue updated progress reports quarterly to ensure consistent inventory of progress on the Goals of the Equitable Energy Efficiency (E3) Proceeding. Detailed descriptions of these Goals and associated Actions and progress to date can be found here. This Progress Report summarizes the current status of the Goals and Actions.

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May 2022

Mapping tools can play an important role in incorporating equity into planning, implementing, and evaluating investments in electric vehicle (EV) charging stations, also referred to as EV chargers or electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE). Federal, state, and local organizations need methodologies for using mapping tools as they pursue equity-focused goals to ensure that the benefits of investments in EV chargers flow to energy and environmental justice (EEJ) underserved communities. This report provides examples of how to apply mapping tools to identify priority locations for installing EV chargers that may benefit EEJ underserved communities through four EV charger planning approaches: corridor charging, community charging, fleet electrification, and diversity in STEM and workforce development. It also explores various methodologies for calculating low-public EVSE density.

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December 2020

Key takeaways Traditionally, utilities have approached customers as equals, offering them one-size-fits-all solutions. But equality doesn’t equal fairness. You need to offer equitable, tailored solutions to your customers, especially since more than one-third of US households are energy insecure. There are various ways you can be a part of the energy equity solution, including partnering with community groups, autoenrolling vulnerable customers in money-saving programs, and committing to a diverse workplace.

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January 2021

On December 11, 2020, 28 PNNL staff members discussed research to advance energy equity and environmental justice at a two-hour internal workshop. The primary purposes of the workshop were to baseline existing efforts at the laboratory and brainstorm future research activities. This report covers the workshop discussion and new research areas and questions, broken into energy system topics. Appendix A lists PNNL staff in attendance and Appendix B contains a full workshop agenda.

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May 2021

This review offers a discussion on how energy storage deployment advances equitable outcomes for the power system. It catalogues the four tenets of the energy justice concept—distributive, recognition, procedural, and restorative—and shows how they relate to inequities in energy affordability, availability, due process, sustainability, and responsibility.

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January 2022

This article by Georgia Power highlights their 2022 Integrated Resource Plan which includes a proactive, innovative, and transformational roadmap for how the company will continue to meet the needs of customers, local communities, and the State of Georgia for future generations.

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July 2021

This article highlights The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) efforts to expand its 100 percent renewable energy goal to include social equity and greater community input.

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October 2021

This article highlights a community resilience project that the author believes can become a model for energy equity.

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March 2021

Strategic federal investment in electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure can accelerate the transition to a less polluting transportation system and could be an impactful component of a national climate and infrastructure program. The EV charging infrastructure investments needed to address the climate and public health crises facing the United States also present an opportunity to advance equity and environmental justice, catalyze emerging markets for clean energy technologies, spur job creation, and help to avert a prolonged economic recession. Drawing on lessons and examples from previous stimulus investments, existing state and federal programs, and recently-introduced clean energy, climate, and transportation bills, this paper provides a menu of options for federal infrastructure and stimulus packages and describes the scale of EV charging infrastructure investments needed to catalyze the transition to zero-emission transportation. The paper also discusses how new investments in transportation electrification can center equity and environmental justice to ensure better health and economic outcomes for communities overburdened by pollution, hardest hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, and underserved by the current transportation system.

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January 2022

The Energy Equity Project Framework (EEP Framework, “the Framework”) is an open source document available at no cost to the general public. All of its contents may be freely used and shared for non-commercial purposes. When referencing the document or a concept, idea, or other content that is drawn specifically from the Framework in printed or static website materials, please attribute the work as detailed in the suggested citations. Informally, as in blogs, social media posts, and video interviews, we appreciate a shoutout, too. The framework is a holistic guide to measuring and advancing energy equity. Our goal is that the framework is used to directly benefit Black, Brown, Native, frontline, and low-income communities. If your purpose in using the framework conflicts with these goals, we kindly ask you to reconsider. The framework has numerous potential uses, which we discuss in detail in the EEP Overview chapter. This work was made possible by the generous support of: Energy Foundation Joyce Foundation Crown Family Philanthropies

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May 2022

Even with significant state rebates and lower total ownership costs driven by cheaper fueling and maintenance, new electric vehicles often are out of reach for lower-income residents. Lower-income Californians are less likely to have access to the capital necessary to buy new electric vehicles (with higher upfront costs than conventional vehicles), as well as access to charging stations and information on zero-emission vehicle benefits and incentive programs. To address this challenge, UC Berkeley School of Law’s Center for Law, Energy & the Environment (CLEE) and UCLA School of Law’s Emmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment convened experts in December 2021 to develop recommendations for policy action. Their ideas informed this report.

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January 2022

Other industries, such as banking, retail, and hospitality, have seen great success with customer satisfaction when implementing digital marketing strategies. Missing the boat on customer satisfaction can cost a company in trust and revenue. The following techniques foster excellent, one-on-one customer service, thus improving brand loyalty and contentment: Meet customers where they are Treat every customer like a VIP Delight customers at every interaction Enables and empowers employees Be relevant, timely, and useful Monitor, evaluate, refine, and repeat When combined, these strategies can create memorable, personal interactions that meet customers where they are, exceeding their expectations and making them feel like exclusive customers.

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June 2022

Having abundant and affordable access to transportation affects an individual's ability to live a healthy and fulfilling life. To date, a majority of carshare models have been implemented in urban, affluent areas, and have not focused on electric vehicles (EVs). Recently, Forth has developed and tested a variety of EV car share programs, with the goal of identifying and understanding best practices and challenges associated with implementing these programs in underserved locations, specifically in low-income and rural areas. In this paper, we will share the design and results to date of several of these programs, as well as a framework for designing a carshare program.

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June 2022

For many living in the U.S., limited access to transportation and disproportionate exposure to emissions are barriers stemming from policies that discriminate on the basis of race. Electric transportation programs can address these challenges. Partnerships between racial equity advocates and environmental organizations are vital to ensure that such programs are successful. Together, Forth and the Greenlining Institute created the Towards Equitable Electric Mobility (TEEM) Community of Practice, with the goal to build the capacity for equity-focused and traditional organizations to work together more effectively on transportation electrification at the state level.

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The Department of Energy's Office of Electricity (OE) recognizes that our nation's sustained economic prosperity, quality of life, and global competitiveness depends on an abundance of secure, reliable, and affordable energy resources. OE leads the Department of Energy's efforts to ensure a resilient, and flexible electricity system in the United States. Learn more about OE >>

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