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University of Colorado, Boulder Project Description

The University of Colorado is building a graduate engineering program with the capacity to train a large number of students from diverse backgrounds with the skills needed to be leaders in the next generation of Smart Grids. The Digital Energy Program focuses on networking, wireless communication, and cyber security within energy systems. Instruction is provided on-campus and through long distance learning. Students can earn a Master??s degree, a five-year joint electrical engineering Bachelor??s degree and telecommunications Master??s degree, or an Energy Communication Networks certificate. Discounts will be granted to students and scholarships will be given based on need or merit. Working with a large network of industry partners ensures that the curriculum is relevant and skills marketable, provides access to additional training opportunities and internships, and assists in job placement. Students will also work with industry and professional associations to increase employment networking.

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Syracuse University Project Description

Syracuse University and collaborating partners are creating an innovative curriculum to deliver regional and distance offerings of associate, undergraduate, and graduate degrees in Smart Grid technologies. This multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary effort includes participation from academic and industry partners, and technology manufacturers. The curriculum includes a comprehensive spectrum of knowledge and skills from Smart Grid basics to the technical requirements associated with the design, security, and operation of communication and control devices. Curriculum courses include topics such as Advances in Grid Infrastructure, Smart Grid Security, Monitoring and Diagnostics, Bulk Power Transmission Systems, Wireless Networking, and Modern Power Systems. The project will be conducted at four locations in upstate New York: Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and Potsdam. Courses will be delivered in the classroom, online, in cyber laboratories, and will include site visits to installations of Smart Grid components. Students will have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience by working with National Grid??s Smart Technology Centre in Liverpool, New York. Plans also include the establishment of a Power Systems Laboratory at the University of Buffalo and Buffalo State College, and a Sensor and Measurement Laboratory and a Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory at Syracuse University.

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At a Glance: AMI-Enabled Customer Benefits

March 2019

AMI has created an opportunity-rich environment for utilities to meet their customers' – including small businesses–expectations and empower them with choices, data, and tools like never before. With AMI, utilities can better engage with customers not only by providing information about usage, but projecting monthly bills, alerting customers to unusual usage patterns, and sending proactive messages about outages and restoration times.This document provides a list of customer benefits enabled by AMI.

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At a Glance: How Utilities are Using AMI Beyond Meter Reading

March 2019

AMI gives utilities specific, measured data about the state of the distribution grid out to the grid edge, allowing operators to find–and fix–issues faster. Mining and analyzing the meter events, alarms and logs, and pairing meter data with other system data–SCADA, GIS, OMS for example–provides operational benefits that go far beyond meter reading. This document provides a list of operational uses for AMI data.

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Voice of Experience | Leveraging AMI Networks and Data

March 2019

In a year-long effort, the Department of Energy convened utilities from across the United States to talk about how utilities are using their AMI networks and data to optimize their systems and provide a better customer experience. Many utilities have moved far beyond their original business case of reducing meter reading costs and are now using the data to gain insights into their systems and operations that were not possible before AMI. Voice of Experience | Leveraging AMI Networks and Data captures the advice, insights and lessons learned from the utilities at the forefront of this emerging technology.

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Leveraging AMI Networks and Data

March 2019

The original business cases for implementing an advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) focused on the cost savings that could be achieved from avoided truck rolls and the end of manual meter reading. Now more than a decade since smart meters hit the industry, utilities are learning that the value of AMI goes far beyond logging energy usage. Advanced meters are end-point sensors that provide granular information on system operations enabling utilities to operate more efficiently and on customer energy usage providing opportunities to develop a new relationship with their customers. This report documents how engineers, data analysts, product developers, customer service representatives, and people throughout the organization are digging into the data, pairing it with other data, asking more questions, gaining insights and making data-driven decisions.

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Sensor Technologies and Data Analytics

December 2018

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Electricity (OE) Advanced Grid Research and Development Division is proposing a new Sensor Technologies and Data Analytics Program that will provide new tools and critical information to mitigate and respond to potential issues and threats related to the nation's electric grid. The Program will develop and integrate high-fidelity, fast acting sensor technologies and advanced data analytics into the power grid. The Program will also revolutionize the use of these technologies in electricity operations and delivery - from transmission to distribution to end-use load - for improved diagnostics, prediction, and prescription of all system variables and assets during normal and extreme-event conditions. Advances in data analytics are needed to enable utilizing an increasing number of heterogeneous data sources from the sensor technologies to infer complex underlying dynamics, diagnose system behavior and abnormalities, and provide situational awareness for operators to make informed decisions. The outcome of Sensor Technologies and Data Analytics research and development (R&D) will enable greater speed, accuracy, and precision in determining the state of the power system. This will meet the needs of managing grid assets and operations with their increased complexity, as well as monitoring and managing interconnected and interdependent effects among the nation's critical infrastructures-all under increasing levels of threat conditions.

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Integrating Intermittent Resources

August 2017

From Hawaii to New York utilities are preparing their systems for a growing penetration of customer-sited generation. They are testing and adopting new technology designed to provide better visibility and control; collecting and interpreting the increasing amounts of data needed to plan, forecast and model their future systems; and focusing on their customers - listening and responding like never before - plus streamlining their processes to enable faster interconnections with more transparency. The report documents what utilities are learning about operating differently, streamlining the interconnection process, planning and forecasting with these new resources, understanding hosting capacity, testing advanced inverters, and engaging their customers.

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Voices of Experience: Integrating Intermittent Resources - What Utilities are Learning

July 2017

From Hawaii to New York utilities are preparing their systems for a growing penetration of customer-sited generation. They are testing and adopting new technology designed to provide better visibility and control; collecting and interpreting the increasing amounts of data needed to plan, forecast, and model their future systems; and focusing on their customers-listening and responding like never before-plus streamlining their processes to enable faster interconnections with more transparency. Because no matter where they are now, utilities know that in the future, they will be operating differently. Realizing the benefits of bringing utilities together to share their experiences, the Department of Energy"s Office of Energy Delivery and Electricity Reliability assembled a working group of utility representatives to collect the experiences, insights, and lessons learned from integrating intermittent resources on the distribution grid. (More information on the working group is included in Appendix A.) The working group participated in a series of topic-based discussions and regional meetings where the utilities at the forefront of this transition provided valuable insight into the challenges, solutions, and lessons learned from integrating variable generation. The purpose of the Voices of Experience | Integrating Intermittent Resources is to share that knowledge with the industry to enable utilities to better prepare for the operational challenges they face.One of the initial insights from this project is that utilities large and small - and from across the country-are interested in this topic. Even those with very little customer-sited generation recognized that these resources will be a growing part of their generation mix going forward, whether because of state policies or growing customer interest. These utilities wanted to be proactive by discussing challenges and successes, and learning from others so they could prepare for the future. And the main message from the utilities on the leading edge: Start preparing now.

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Grid Impacts, Benefits, and Lessons Learned - Final

December 2016

This document provides a list of key reports and case studies, and will be updated periodically as new materials are published and posted on SmartGrid.gov.

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Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) Program Final Report

December 2016

In 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) launched the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) program, funded by $3.4 billion invested through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to modernize the nation"s electricity system. Projects began in 2010, and the program was completed in 2015.This final report summarizes the major SGIG achievements, key project results, and lessons learned across the smart grid landscape, which included:Synchrophasor technologies on electric transmission systems.Distribution automation (DA) technologies and systems, including advanced sensors and self-healing controls.Advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), including smart meters and two-way communications networks.Customer systems, including in-home displays (IHD), programmable communicating thermostats (PCT), and direct load control devices (DLC) that enable utilities to offer time-based rates and incentives.

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Final Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies (CBS)

November 2016

This report presents final results from the ten electric utilities who agreed to conduct consumer behavior studies (CBS) and produce comprehensive reports with the aim of evaluating customer acceptance, retention, and response to various types of time-based rate programs implemented in conjunction with information and control technologies such as in-home displays (IHD) and programmable communicating thermostats (PCT).

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Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies

October 2016

Under the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) program, the U.S. Department of Energy partnered with several electric utilities to conduct Consumer Behavior Studies (CBS). The goals involved applying randomized and controlled experimental designs for estimating customer responses more precisely and credibly to advance understanding of time-based rates and customer systems, and provide new information for improving program designs, implementation strategies, and evaluations. This report presents results from the interim and final evaluations for all 10 of the CBS utilities.

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Distribution Automation: Results from the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program

September 2016

This report shares key results from the 62 Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects implementing distribution automation (DA) technologies and also documents lessons learned on technology installation and implementation strategies. With this report, the U.S. Department of Energy aims to further accelerate grid modernization by helping decision makers better assess the cost-effectiveness of DA investments and learn from leading-edge utilities.

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Advanced Metering Infrastructure and Customer Systems: Results from the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program

September 2016

This report shares key results and benefits from the 70 Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects implementing advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) and customer system technologies, and also documents lessons learned on technology installation and implementation strategies. With this report, the U.S. Department of Energy aims to further accelerate grid modernization by helping decision makers to better assess the cost-effectiveness of AMI and customer system investments and learn from leading-edge utilities.

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Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration, a Regional Smart Grid Demonstration Project

September 2016

With a vision of safely providing a more reliable and affordable electric system, Southern California Edison Company (SCE) has been awarded up to $39.6 million in matching funds from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct the Irvine Smart Grid Demonstration (ISGD). This demonstration is testing the interoperability and effectiveness of key elements of the electric grid from the transmission level through the distribution system and into the customer premises. This end-to-end demonstration of smart grid technologies is helping SCE address several profound changes impacting the electric grids operation, including increased use of renewable resources, more intermittent generation connecting to the distribution system, the ability of customers to actively manage the way they use electricity, and policies and mandates focused on improving the environment and promoting energy security.

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Time-of-Use as a Default Rate for Residential Customers: Issues and Insights

June 2016

This report provides decision makers, policy officials, and other electric power industry stakeholders, who have either committed to (e.g., California, Massachusetts) or are considering (e.g., New York) transitioning residential customers specifically to time-of-use (TOU) rates as the default rate design within the next several years, with empirical evidence that seeks to better address the concerns of a variety of industry stakeholders. Using interval meter data, survey data, and other data collected during the Sacramento Municipal Utility District"s (SMUD) Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) co-funded consumer behavior study (CBS) that took place during the summers of 2012 and 2013, LBNL analyzed residential customers who (1) volunteered for, or (2) were defaulted into, a study in order to quantify the differences between these two recruitment methods in terms of adoption, retention, and response to TOU rates. Of particular importance from a policy perspective is an assessment of those who might be better off for having been defaulted onto the TOU rate or who might be worse off (e.g., financially worse off, unhappy having to alter their electricity consumption behavior, frustrated that their electric rate was changed) but don"t switch to another rate. In particular, improving our understanding of these different subpopulations can help policy and decision makers make that transition more successful (e.g., limited customer complaints, low opt-out enrollment rates, high retention rates, and/or high customer response).

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Overview of the Time-of-Use as a Default Rate for Residential Customers: Issues and Insights

June 2016

This presentation outlines the key insights from the Sacramento Municipal Utility District"s (SMUD) Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) co-funded consumer behavior study (CBS) on time-of-use (TOU) as a default rate for residential customers.

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Advancement of Synchrophasor Technology in Projects Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

March 2016

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 provided $4.5 billion to the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) to modernize the U.S. power grid, create jobs, and stimulate the economy. The majority of the funding went to competitively selected industry projects under the Smart Grid Investment Grants (SGIG) and Smart Grid Demonstration Program (SGDP)-in which participants matched or exceeded ARRA funds with private funding.DOE and industry partners invested a total of more than $357 million to deploy synchrophasor technology that will provide grid operators with unprecedented wide-area visibility to better sense the behavior of the transmission system and improve reliability. Traditionally, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems have been used to monitor and control power systems by measuring grid conditions every 2 to 4 seconds.Synchrophasor technology, however, uses high-resolution phasor measurement units (PMUs) that provide time-synchronized data at a rate of more than 30 times per second to detect disturbances that often cannot be observed with SCADA systems. For example, network oscillations that could destabilize the power grid are readily detected by synchrophasor technology.Connecting PMUs that are strategically located across the power grid with high-speed communications networks provides grid operators with wide-area visibility to better detect system disturbances, improve the grid"s efficiency, and prevent or more quickly recover from outages.

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DTE Energy Advanced Implementation of Energy Storage Technologies Final Technology Performance Report

March 2016

This report describes the implementation of 1-MW of distributed Li-ion energy storage on a distribution circuit in the DTE Energy service area. DTE Energy is a Michigan based diversified Energy Company that provides electric service to 2.1 million residential, business and industrial customers in southeast Michigan.DTE Energy has worked with selected sub recipients, consultants, contractors and vendors to demonstrate the use and benefits of distributed energy storage, often referred to as Community Energy Storage (CES), in a utility territory and to test the ability to integrate secondary use electric vehicle (EV) batteries in the CES demonstration.This is the first large scale utility community energy storage project with an aggregated capacity of 1-MW. Its 21 energy storage systems were managed by a Distributed Energy Resource Management System (DERMS). This DERMS was created to allow aggregation of any asset within the DTE Energy service territory using utility industry protocol (DNP3).This project installed 18 S&C Electric (S&C) supplied 25kW/50kWh CES units, a 500kW Li-ion battery storage device integrated with a 500 kW solar system and two repurposed (secondary use) energy storage systems using Fiat Chrysler Automobile (FCA) 500e EV batteries. The first CES unit was installed at the DTE Energy Training and Development Center in Westland, MI for installation training, verification of work and operational procedures, and engineering design documentation. The remaining 17 CES units and the 500 kW battery are installed on a distribution circuit designated as TRINITY 9342 located near Monroe, MI. The repurposed batteries were installed at DTE Energy headquarter and at Next Energy Center in Detroit.The project objectives are to integrate the CES units into the electric utility system, determine the performance of the CES and the control system, and the development and integration of CES devices from secondary-use battery. The analysis identified gaps, improvements, and suggestions on how devices and control systems can be standardized.

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Recovery Act Smart Grid Document Collection

February 2016

This document provides a list of key reports and case studies, and will be updated periodically as new materials are published and posted on SmartGrid.gov. Formerly: Grid Impacts, Benefits, and Lessons Learned (Nov, 2015)

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American Transmission Company (ATC) PMU Final Project Description

February 2016

American Transmission Company LLC's (ATC's) Phasor Measurement Unit  project deployed synchrophasor technologies to expand collection of synchrophasor data from 25 to 70 substations across the company's service area. The project deployed phasor measurement units (PMUs) and data collection software, and digital fault  recorders (DFRs) were upgraded to achieve PMU functionality. This project was associated with ATC's Enhanced Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition and PMU Communications Backbone Project, another project funded through the Smart Grid Investment Grant program.

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Southern California Edison Company Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project Technology Performance Report #2

February 2016

This is the second of three Technology Performance Reports (TPR) for the Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (TSP). The TSP is jointly funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) (American Reinvestment and Recovery Act - ARRA) and Southern California Edison (SCE). The TSP is a demonstration of a Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) connected directly to the SCE sub-transmission grid. The facility is located approximately 100 miles northeast of Los Angeles, in Tehachapi, CA at the corner of Williamson Road and East Tehachapi Boulevard.TPR #1 (issued 12/31/2014 with subsequent iterations) was primarily concerned with the description of events during construction, commissioning and characterization testing of the TSP facility. This TPR #2 is concerned with the troubleshooting of various issues and the tuning of the custom designed facility as well as initial operations yielding first instances of project test data. TPR #3 is expected to report on the continuous operation of the facility and test data satisfying the project scope and Metrics and Benefits Reporting Plan (MBRP).The main objective of the TSP is to evaluate the performance of utility scale lithium ion battery technology in improving grid performance and integrating intermittent generation, e.g., wind. The primary object is to use electrical energy storage to manage conventional energy flows in a time dependent function in order to address grid instability and capacity issues that result from the interconnection of highly variable generation resources.

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Hazel Spindle Final Technology Report (TPR)

February 2016

Hazle designed, built, commissioned, and operates a utility-scale 20 MW flywheel energy storage plant in Hazle Township, Pennsylvania (the Hazle Facility) using flywheel technology developed by its affiliate, Beacon Power, LLC (Beacon Power). The Hazle Facility provides frequency regulation services to the regional transmission organization, PJM Interconnection, LLC (PJM), through its participation in PJM's Regulation Market (a market-based system for the purchase and sale of the Regulation ancillary service). The zero emission Hazle Facility is designed for a 20 year-life over which it is capable of performing at least 100,000 full depth of discharge cycles. To achieve its 20 MW capacity, the Hazle Facility is comprised of two hundred of Beacon Power's 100 kilowatt (kW)/25 kilowatt/hour (kWh) flywheels connected in parallel. The Hazle Facility can fully respond to a signal from PJM in less than 2 seconds. The Hazle facility was constructed in an economic development zone designated by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and its construction relied on local contractors and labor for completion.

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Amber Kinetics, Inc. Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration Final Technical Report

December 2015

In this program, Amber Kinetics designed, built, and tested a sub-scale 5 kWh engineering prototype flywheel system. Applying lessons learned from the engineering prototype, Amber Kinetics then designed, built, and tested full-size, commerical-scale 25 kWh flywheel systems. The systems underwent basic functional qualification testing before being installed, sequentially, at the company's outdoor test site in Alameda, CA, for full-speed field testing.

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