Skip to main content

Resource Library Search Results

Search Smartgrid.gov by keywords, phrase, title, author, publication date, or file name.

176 to 200 of 1885 results are displayed.
score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Long Island Power Authority Long Island Smart Energy Corridor Project Description

September 2015

The Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) is creating a Smart Energy Corridor located along Long Island, New York business Route 110. The Corridor work includes the installation of smart meters; upgrade and enhancement of monitoring equipment at three Corridor substations; and the installation of additional distribution automation equipment. The project will evaluate the impact on customer behavior and consumption with alternative tariff structures, information and analytical tools provided. The project will demonstrate how distribution automation could reduce the number and duration of unplanned interruptions at reduced cost and with increased reliability. Stony Brook University is developing expert systems software in support of LIPA"s automation thrust, with cybersecurity capabilities. Farmingdale State College is supporting the project with public outreach through on-campus demonstration of small-scale wind, solar, plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEV) and fuel cells. An energy efficient model home is under construction and will be open to public tours to attract visitors to the campus and to promote energy efficiency concepts.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Smart Grid Regional Demonstration Project Description

September 2015

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is collaborating with a consortium of research institutions to develop new Smart Grid technologies, quantify costs and benefits, validate new models, and create prototypes to be adapted nationally. The project consists of four broad initiatives, including:Demand Response (DR): perform an integrated demonstration of Smart Grid operations and technology as applied to DR. Test bed sites will investigate a full range of user environments: residential, commercial, light industrial, and institutionalElectric Vehicle (EV) Integration into the LADWP Grid: demonstrate aspects such as smart charging and battery aggregation; renewables and EV battery integration; an operational microgrid; demonstration of a ride/car share program at LADWP; and EV test bed sites at USC and UCLACustomer Behavior: demonstrate a comprehensive portfolio of studies and focused surveys related to the impact of Smart Grid communications systems and processes on customer usage; energy savings from using Smart Grid enabled interfaces; pricing options and programs; and effective messaging and incentives regarding electric vehiclesNext-Generation Cyber Security: demonstrate technologies to show grid resilience against physical and cyber-attack, an operational testing approach for components & installed systems, and redefine the security perimeter to address Smart Grid technologies to the meter in residential and commercial sites

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

The Boeing Company Boeing Smart Grid Solution Project Description

September 2015

Boeing and its partner PJM Interconnection will demonstrate the benefits of advanced technologies for improving cyber security in an energy management environment. This project is differentiated by its ability to leverage network architecture and industry leading security experience and capabilities that are scalable and interoperable with both legacy systems and new smart grid technologies. The PJM project region covers all or part of 13 states and the District of Columbia, includes over 243,000 square miles, and serves more than 61 million people. This densely populated region accounts for more than 26% of total generation and load for the entire Eastern Interconnection. Boeing will demonstrate a combination of technologies that it has successfully implemented in the commercial, defense, and intelligence communities that will result in enhanced situational awareness and security. The project will commence with an in-depth security assessment of the regional network and the evolving communication, telemetry, and advanced controls required for a secure, reliable power grid. Assessment results will determine the set of selected technologies to be evaluated, integrated and tested for inclusion as part of the cyber security suite for the strong, secure, smart grid. The project will conclude with operational demonstrations conducted for government and industry stakeholders. Deliverables will include reports on technology benefits achieved through analysis, experimentation and demonstration. Results will contribute significantly to providing metrics for assessing smart grid progress for the transmission system. Thus the project will advance the DOE's ultimate goals of increasing the reliability of the grid, providing greater security, and establishing a baseline for grid-wide replication.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

NSTAR Electric and Gas Corporation Automated Meter Reading-Based Dynamic Pricing Project Description

September 2015

NSTAR is enabling residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use, critical peak rates, and rebates) and two-way direct load control by capturing Automated Meter Reading (AMR) data transmissions and communicating through existing customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with home area networks. This will enable recording and transfer of interval consumption data to NSTAR via a two-way communications pathway that can also be used for sending load control signals, measuring demand response loads, and conducting event-specific impact evaluations. Customers can view their real-time energy consumption and costs through in-home displays and via a web portal. This approach has been validated in NSTAR"s Smart Grid test lab. The project demonstration includes approximately 2,700 residential customers in the Boston area. Data collection will span two summer (i.e., cooling) seasons and occur over a period of about 24 months.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

NSTAR Electric and Gas Corporation Urban Grid Monitoring and Renewables Integration Project Description

September 2015

NSTAR will enhance grid monitoring instrumentation on one of its secondary area network grids in downtown Boston, MA using state-of-the-art sensor equipment to monitor current and conductor temperature. This project will monitor grid-points in about 445 manholes with a layered instrumentation approach. The manholes designated minor nodes (about 315) will have sensors that detect high and low current and cable temperature threshold values on individual secondary-main cables within the grid-point. These nodes will have wireless transmitters to broadcast the alarms which will be collected wirelessly. The major nodes manholes (about 130) will be instrumented with technology to provide current sensing on a real time basis and be equipped with powerline carrier technology to allow near real-time monitoring at the operations center. Advanced metering infrastructure-capable meters will be deployed at customer locations on the grid where solar photovoltaics (PV) are located and will monitor consumption. In two substations, the remote terminal units will be upgraded to include programmable logic controllers (PLCs) to store network feeder information, continuously analyze data, and take actions when necessary. Information from the sensors, smart meters, and SCADA data will be sent to a repository for analysis.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

NV Energy Nevada Dynamic Pricing Trial Interim Report - Volume 2

September 2015

The intent of the Nevada Dynamic Pricing Trial is to monitor and understand household changes in electricity use that may occur as a result of various combinations of three treatments: rates, education and technology. Volume 2 includes the preliminary data analyses of Program Year 1 NDPT data. Below, after providing a brief review of the NDPT structure, we review data and programming preparation, the analytic methodology employed, definitions of the time periods and prices, descriptions of hypotheses analyzed, and results from the preliminary analysis.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

NV Energy Nevada Dynamic Pricing Trial Interim Report - Volume 3

September 2015

The Nevada Dynamic Pricing Trial was designed to test four hypotheses about participant behavior and attitudes. The three primary hypotheses (considered at some length in this Interim Report) are each assertions about participants' behavior: (1) i.e., provided these treatments, the participants will shift and save energy; (2) these shifts and savings will take place for different participants at different times, and (3) these shifts and savings will differ in impact when provided together, as compared to when they are provided individually. Taken together, these three hypotheses suggest that providing new rates, technology, and education to residential utility customers will influence their electricity use. The fourth primary hypothesis is about participants' attitudes, asserting that (4) the participants' energy management responses to the treatments are significantly correlated with the attitudes of energy ownership, and satisfaction with energy ownership. Our fourth hypothesis suggests that the energy ownership attitudes of residential utility customers influence their responses to rates, technology, and education.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

New Hampshire Electric Cooperative Communications Systems Infrastructure/Advanced Metering Infrastructure Final Project Description

September 2015

The New Hampshire Electric Cooperative (NHEC) Communications Systems Infrastructure (CSI)/Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) project involved the installation of two-way voice and data communications infrastructure to support improved communications in the field and smart metering systems for over 83,000 members located throughout New Hampshire. The aim was to help NHEC members manage electricity consumption and associated costs by providing them with detailed usage information and the option to participate in time-based rate programs. In addition, NHEC expected the new systems to improve outage detection and response time, provide tamper detection, and reduce operations and maintenance costs.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Pepco-DC Smart Grid Project - FINAL REPORT

September 2015

The Pepco-District of Columbia Smart Grid Project in Washington, DC, involved distribution automation (DA), advanced metering infrastructure, and demand response programs that involved load control devices and time-based rates. DA included deployment of smart substation devices, automated distribution circuit reclosers/ switches, and network and substation transformer monitors.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Pepco-Maryland Smart Grid Project - FINAL REPORT

September 2015

The Pepco-Maryland Smart Grid Project entailed deployment of distribution automation (DA) technology on 67 circuits, an advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) system, a meter data management system (MDMS), a customer web portal, and a demand response program that involved direct load control and time-based rate programs. DA equipment included smart substation devices, automated distribution circuit reclosers/switches, fault indicators, and transformer monitors.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Bridging the Gaps on Prepaid Utility Service

September 2015

A modern electric grid offers utilities and consumers wide-ranging new opportunities. Investments made through The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) helped catalyze the transition to a modern grid by providing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with $4.5 billion to advance the deployment of smart grid technologies. This investment, leveraged with equivalent funding from the electricity industry, has helped utilities acquire and deploy technologies that enable a more intelligent electricity delivery system, including more than 15 million smart meters, 20,000 substation monitors, and 1,000 new synchrophasors. The large-scale deployment of smart meters and supporting technology through these projects is now enabling utilities to explore new consumer-facing programs and service offerings. Consumers, in turn, have many more choices about how they purchase electricity and manage their energy use. Prepaid utility service - which allows consumers to pay in advance for their electricity - is one area where these changes converge.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Reliant Energy Retail Services, LLC - Smart Grid Enabled Consumer Participation Final Project Description

September 2015

Reliant Energy Retail Services' (Reliant's) Smart Grid Enabled Consumer Participation project deployed new home energy management equipment, services, and market offerings for retail customers in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) region. The project deployed in-home energy displays, smart appliances, and new time-based rate programs for customers, along with individualized weekly usage emails that helped customers understand their energy consumption patterns. Thanks to its position as a licensed retail energy provider within ERCOT, Reliant has access to the Smart Meter Texas data exchange, which the company used to obtain interval meter data and communicate usage, trending, and home energy management information to customers.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

City of Anaheim Public Utilities Department - Model for Small and Midsize Utility Districts around the United States - FINAL REPORT

September 2015

The City of Anaheim Public Utilities Department's smart grid project involved a limited deployment of advanced metering infrastructure and an expansion of distribution automation capabilities. Distribution automation devices included circuit switches, remote fault indicators, and smart relays. In addition, an enterprise service bus was installed to provide the interface to the meter data management system, customer information system, and the outage management system.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Energy Storage with Staying Power

September 2015

Energy storage from batteries promises to maximize distributed and renewable energy's usefulness on and off the electric grid. For example solar energy collected in the afternoon may not be available in the evening, when consumers most need it, unless batteries store the excess energy. There is a tradeoff in batteries between energy and power density versus longevity and low cost. With its $10.4-million cooperative research agreement under the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Smart Grid Demonstration Program, which provided $5.2 million, Aquion demonstrated a pilot ambient-temperature, Aqueous Hybrid Ion (AHI) battery system. The system's stability, longevity, and energy efficiency makes it an option for supporting distributed generation, reducing peak load on the grid, and helping to regulate the voltage and frequency on transmission and distribution lines. The stable and and safe battery chemistry makes it an option for off-grid, substation and community energy storage applications.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Demonstrating Coordinated Resources in the Pacific Northwest

September 2015

Battelle led 11 regional utilities, six technology partners and two universities under one smart grid project with $89 million from the U.S. Department of Energy's Smart Grid Demonstration Program. The funding, derived from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, was matched by the project participants, and allowed for: Modernizing distribution infrastructure with smart-grid-enabled components. Deploying transactive control to bring market incentives to smaller producers and consumers of electricity, thereby providing a level playing field for new entrants and business models.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Harnessing New Generation and Storage Technologies for the Grid

September 2015

Chicago may be known as the windy city, but Texas is increasingly becoming the wind-powered state. With the largest wind-generation capacity in the country and wind speeds reaching 80 miles per hour in some areas, Texas is increasingly building and operating wind turbines to power the grid. Smart grid technologies that could make wind more dispatchable were investigated by the Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies (CCET), located in Austin, Texas. CCET is a consortium of state utilities, technology companies and universities established in 2005. The project was awarded $13.5 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds, for a total project value of $27.1 million. CCET is demonstrating the technical and business feasibility of existing and new technologies that can integrate wind power into the state's grid, managed by the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The project, Discovery Across Texas, affects 24 million customers throughout the state.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

East Penn Manufacturing Delivers New Battery Technology for Electrical Grid Support

September 2015

The U.S. electric grid operates at a frequency near 60 Hz, with generation and loads adjusted to keep the frequency within a few tenths of 60 Hz. Larger deviations from this base frequency are an indicator of grid distress, i.e. over-generation or overload. Frequency regulation of the electric grid can be provided by batteries, which can respond in milliseconds, to help continuously maintain grid frequency in an optimal operation range by exchanging power with the grid. To solve this problem, East Penn Manufacturing Co., a battery manufacturer located in Lyon Station, PA is demonstrating battery energy storage that can be interconnected to the electric grid and provide services such as frequency regulation and peak shaving. These services support grid stability and increased renewable generation on the grid. In 2010, East Penn entered a cooperative agreement totaling $5,087,269, including $2,543,523 of funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Smart Grid Demonstration Program (SGDP) to build an energy storage facility to support electric grid operation.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Spinning a Solution to Momentary Electric Grid Disturbances

September 2015

The Hazle Spindle flywheel grid frequency regulation project, part of the Smart Grid Demonstration Program (SGDP), is making the grid more reliable at its Humboldt Industrial Park plant in Hazle Township, Pa. With its $52.4-million cooperative research agreement under the U.S. Department of Energy's Smart Grid Demonstration Program, which provided $24.1 million, the recipient, originally named Beacon Power, was to design, build and operate a utility-scale 20 MW flywheel plant, where power from the electric grid can accelerate the flywheel, which can then return the power to the grid when needed, with few losses. The Beacon Gen4 flywheel is designed to provide 100 kW of output and store 25 kWh of energy. Two hundred flywheels were connected in parallel to provide 20 MW in capacity, spanning a 40 MW range of frequency regulation. The system can fully respond to a grid imbalance in less than four seconds, allowing it to correct short-term unpredictable imbalances in electricity supply and demand. Because the system is mechanical, it can repeatedly operate at 75% depth of discharge with 85% round-trip efficiency, and is sturdy enough so there is virtually no energy degradation over time. The flywheels are built to last at least 20 years, or 100,000 cycles at full rated depth of discharge.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Honeywell International, Inc. Full-Scale Implementation of Automated Demand Response Final Project Description

September 2015

Honeywell International, Inc. (Honeywell) worked with Southern California Edison (SCE), Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) to demonstrate, on a utility program scale, commercial acceptance of automated demand response (autoDR). Honeywell provided a turnkey utility-style program effort to sign up and implement technology for commercial and industrial customers whose average electric load exceeds 200 kilowatts (kW). Large-scale customer adoption of autoDR enables partner utilities to initiate and automatically execute customized load shedding and other strategies in response to peak load event notifications or price signals. Honeywell provides all aspects of customer delivery for the autoDR program, including customer audits, installation of customer-sited automated load control devices, and recommendations for optimal demand response strategies. This project coincides with the California utilities' adoption of critical peak pricing (CPP). CPP is a mandatory tariff for new large commercial customers. The project aimed to address obstacles to effective participation in demand response programs and secure load shed during demand response events.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Renovating the Grid and Revitalizing a Neighborhood

September 2015

At its best, the smart grid interweaves diverse technologies to form a seamless whole, like a tightly woven piece of cloth. As the grid modernizes, Kansas City Power & Light (KCP&L;) is using its Smart Grid Demonstration Project to show how distribution systems such as advanced metering infrastructure, distribution management, outage management, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) can interoperate to improve reliability and cost of service. The project, called the Green Impact Zone SmartGrid Demonstration, was awarded nearly $24 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds, for a total project value of $49.8 million, to demonstrate, test, and assess the feasibility of integrating new and existing technologies in an end-to-end smart grid. KCP&L; deployed smart grid technologies across a 5-square-mile area of Kansas City, Mo., serving 13,427 customers. Several major aspects of the project included the modernization of a distribution substation, the implementation of several new systems to prevent and shorten outages, and the installation of devices in customers' homes to help them control their energy use.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Improving Security in the Growing Smart Energy Corridor

September 2015

In New York, the Smart Grid Demonstration Program (SGDP) project of the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) is improving cybersecurity while expanding the advanced metering infrastructure (AMI). Located on Long Island along New York business route 110, the Smart Energy Corridor demonstration project began in February 2010 and runs until February 2015. Partners include the Research Foundation of the State University of New York (SUNY) at Farmingdale and the Research Foundation of SUNY at Stony Brook. LIPA, the country's second-largest utility in terms of revenue, operates from Long Island, NY, and serves 1.1 million customers. It is modernizing its electric distribution systems with a $25.3-million cooperative research agreement including $12.5 million of U.S. Department of Energy funding under its Smart Grid Demonstration Program. With this Recovery Act funding, LIPA is creating a smart energy corridor by demonstrating the integration of AMI technology with other technologies to serve various smart grid applications. Already, LIPA has added 2,550 new smart meters and a customer web portal during the demonstration project. Other AMI additions include six pad mount housing underground switches, 17 automatic sectionalizing units, and 51 two-way capacitor bank controllers.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Voltage and Power Optimization Saves Energy and Reduces Peak Power

September 2015

The smart grid brings increased operating efficiencies to the distribution grid. This is being proven in the Smart Grid Demonstration projects conducted by American Electric Power Ohio, Battelle Memorial Institute, Kansas City Power and Light, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, which provided a rare opportunity to do controlled experiments of the benefits of enhanced voltage control on the grid. Power quality and reliability is improved by voltage optimization. Energy efficiency applications such as conservation voltage reduction can then be safely implemented.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Energy Storage System Firms a Renewable Resource

September 2015

A photovoltaic (PV) plant's output varies widely between days, and even hours, depending on such factors as cloud cover and the sun's angle to the solar panels. These fluctuations present a problem: the source of the PV plant's energy is variable, yet the need to meet electricity demand and keep the grid stable is constant. "On cloudy days, customers aren't changing their usage based on when the sun comes out," says Jon Hawkins of the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM). "As a utility, we are still required to give customers quality power. " PNM is New Mexico's largest electricity provider, serving more than 500,000 customers. In 2009, PNM received a grant for $2.3 million from the U.S. Department of Energy's Smart Grid Demonstration Program to modernize electric distribution systems."

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Making Electricity a Value Proposition for the Consumer

September 2015

In Austin, Texas, the Pecan Street Smart Grid Demonstration Program project shows that the environmentally friendly lifestyle of the future is possible now, in the form of the 711-acre, green Mueller neighborhood. On the former grounds of the airport, Mueller is only three miles from downtown Austin. In today's fast-paced world, Mueller residents enjoy a hybrid small-town, high-tech lifestyle, with houses and businesses linked to each other by bike paths, and to utility companies by the smart grid. Since 2010, researchers have connected 1,200 homes to the smart grid, providing real-time data to users and researchers. Scientists from the University of Texas, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the Environmental Defense Fund are collaborating on the project, which received a $24.6M grant of which $10.4M was the federal share from the Department of Energy. Other partners include Austin Energy; OnStar; and General Motors, who, together, provided $14.2M in matching funds.

score: high
PDF file thumbnail
PDF

Improving Efficiency with Dynamic Line Ratings

September 2015

Comparing dynamic line ratings (DLR) to static line ratings - is a bit like comparing a high-tech video to a black-and-white photograph. Where static line ratings provide seasonally dependent, conservative estimates of overhead transmission-line current capacity, DLR provides real-time, play-by-play data about the effects of air temperature, solar radiation, and wind speed and direction on the transmission line, such as conductor temperature and sag. Armed with this crucial information, along with transmission line physical characteristics, the grid operator is better equipped to target power needs precisely, while safely operating lines that are nearing their thermal limits. Line ratings are critical to prevent excessive power-line drooping, which could cause a fault if lines contact vegetation or other objects. The static rating indicates the maximum amount of current that the line's conductors can carry (under a set of assumed weather conditions) without violating clearance safety codes or damaging the conductor. With line ratings, operators can determine how much power can

176 to 200 of 1885 results are displayed.
Resource Library Search

The Department of Energy's Office of Electricity (OE) recognizes that our nation's sustained economic prosperity, quality of life, and global competitiveness depends on an abundance of secure, reliable, and affordable energy resources. OE leads the Department of Energy's efforts to ensure a resilient, and flexible electricity system in the United States. Learn more about OE >>

smartgrid:master prod build 9